Peter Hobbins awarded the 2016 Merewether Scholarship

Peter Hobbins awarded the 2016 Merewether Scholarship

University of Sydney historian Dr Peter Hobbins has been awarded the 2016 Merewether Scholarship by the State Library of New South Wales for his project ‘Curios and curiosity: James Bray and the sunset of amateur science in colonial Sydney’. Garnering a $12,000 stipend, the scholarship was inaugurated in 2008 to facilitate research and public engagement projects based upon the library’s collections. In extending the themes detailed in his 2013 University of Sydney doctoral thesis, Peter will use the Merewether Scholarship to explore the place of snakes, venoms and vivisection in popularising natural history in late-Victorian Sydney. The award follows Peter‘s recent contract with Manchester University Press to publish his first monograph, Venomous Encounters: Snakes, Vivisection and Scientific Medicine in Colonial Australia. Feature image: Original sketches drawn from nature, by James S. Bray. Mitchell Library, State Library of New South...
Talking Art with Vic McEwan & George Main

Talking Art with Vic McEwan & George Main

Sunday 9 August 2015, 3:00pm to 4:00pm Monster Kitchen & Bar, Hotel Hotel What creative possibilities emerge when a contemporary artist is embedded in a social history museum? Leading interdisciplinary artist and Artistic Director of The Cad Factory, Vic McEwan is spending 2015 at the National Museum of Australia working in close collaboration with curator George Main. Hear Vic and George discuss how their common interest in objects and place have inspired this collaboration. This artist-in-residence program is a collaborative partnership with Hotel Hotel. More information and...
CFP: Foreign Bodies, Intimate Ecologies, Syd, 11-13, Feb 2016

CFP: Foreign Bodies, Intimate Ecologies, Syd, 11-13, Feb 2016

Foreign Bodies, Intimate Ecologies: Transformations in Environmental History 11-13 February, 2016 Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia foreignbodiesintimateecologies.net | #FBIE2016 Environmental history has experienced significant transformations in recent years, driven by a new sense of urgency created by contemporary environmental crises and greater degrees of interdisciplinary engagement. This international symposium engages with these recent trends and transformations that all point towards the need for environmental historians (and those in related fields) to cross established boundaries: temporal, geographical, cultural and disciplinary. It seeks to bring together new research from all periods and regions that address three related themes: borders, space and scale; conflict and contestation; and methods and interdisciplinarity. We particularly welcome proposals that address the following questions: How do more-than-human histories reframe questions of boundaries and scale? And how do they connect the bodily, local and regional with the global or planetary? Can intimate histories of people and environments bring new perspectives to landscapes and waterscapes with contested values? How have particular places and their non-human inhabitants shaped these contestations? In answering these questions, what perspectives can environmental history usefully draw from other humanities disciplines as well as the social and natural sciences?   Keynote speakers: Dr Vinita Damodaran (University of Sussex, UK) Prof. Tom Griffiths (The Australian National University) Dr Dolly Jørgensen (Luleå Technical University, Sweden)   Presentations and abstract submission: We invite proposals for 10 minute and 20 minute presentations. Participants may propose panels of three papers as well as creative, non-traditional formats (for example, a film screening). Please submit a 250 word abstract and 50 word biographical statement to admin@foreignbodiesintimateecologies.net by 1 September 2015. Participants will be notified of the outcome...
ICEHO Environmental History Bulletin 5, July 2015

ICEHO Environmental History Bulletin 5, July 2015

ICEHO Bulletin 5 July 2015 (PDF)   Highlights include a special letter from Kathleen Brosnan, the current President of one of our largest member organizations, the American Society of Environmental History, and a report from the big European Society of Environmental History conference at Versailles. Welcome to a bumper newsletter – something to read in your summer or winter break (depending on where you are in the world). ESEH met just as this Bulletin went to press. We also have an update about the bid from the city of Guimarães to become a Green Capital from immediate past president, Jane Carruthers, who is continuing the connections forged by our World Congress last year. Please keep sending in the news for our regular bulletins. Deadline for material for the next one is 30 September. Libby Robin (President ICEHO) ANU, Canberra Australia   From Jane Carruthers: A very cordial relationship developed over the 2013 World Congress of Environmental History between ICEHO and the City of Guimarães and the University of Minho. This has been maintained with the appointment of ICEHO Board members Jane Carruthers, Verena Winiwarter and Mauro Agnoletti to the Scientific and Monitoring Committee that will assist the city in its application to become the Green Capital of Europe in 2020. Thus far Guimarães has received the accolades of World Heritage Site (2001), European Cultural Capital (2012) and European City of Sport (2013) so the award of Green Capital would complete its record as the outstanding and most prestigious all-round city on the continent! Jane and Mauro recently attended the inaugural meeting of the Committee, delighted to renew their friendship with,...
Mouat Tree Project

Mouat Tree Project

Through the ACT region of the Surveying and Spatial Sciences Institute (SSSI) and in partnership with the Canberra Museum and Gallery (CMAG), Office of the Surveyor-General, ACT Heritage and ACT Parks and Conservation Service (PCS), a project to plan and construct an interpretive structure to house Border Reference Tree H87 (the Mouat Tree) at the Namadgi National Park Visitor Information Centre (VIC) is underway. The Mouat Tree Project invites you to participate in this important conservation and interpretation project. You can be part of preserving this unique chapter in the story of nation building by making a financial contribution to help realise the vision. http://themouattree.org.au/...
Ainslie to Kossie: window on a wonder wander

Ainslie to Kossie: window on a wonder wander

Tuesday 14 July, 12.30–1.30 pm Free entry. Booking essential, details below. Visions Theatre, National Museum of Australia Matthew Higgins’ illustrated presentation on the huge natural appeal of the straight-line route between Canberra and Kosciuszko. Matthew will discuss the animals, birds, plants, geology, water, snow, fire, and human stories that make up the high country. As well as celebrating the route’s biodiversity, Matthew will look at key issues such as feral species and the threat of climate change. Matthew is a Canberra historian who has worked at many of Australia’s national cultural institutions. His latest book, Rugged Beyond Imagination: Stories from an Australian Mountain Region (NMA Press), was shortlisted for the ACT Book of the Year Award, and he has been writing articles for the Canberra Times for more than 30 years. Matthew’s still photography has been broadcast on ABC television and his short nature documentaries have been seen at film festivals around Australia. Matthew is passionate about the high country, and he bush walks and cross-country skis whenever he can....