TEDxSydney: Tom Griffiths – Ice Core Warnings

Tom Griffiths is the W K Hancock Professor of History at the Australian National University and has written a history of Antarctica entitled Slicing the Silence: Voyaging to Antarctica. In January this year he joined the centennial voyage to Mawson’s huts in Antarctica. Tom’s books and essays have won prizes in literature, history, science, politics and journalism, most recently the Prime Minister’s Prize for Australian History in 2008 and the 2009 Alfred Deakin Prize for an Essay Advancing Public Debate. TEDxSydney 2012 took place on Saturday 26 May 2012 at Carriageworks. Tens of thousands of people enjoyed the day: 800 in the theatre, over 1,000 via big screen simulcast in The Forum, many thousands online via YouTube and ABC Big Ideas … and up to 80,000 tuning in to ABC Radio National. Watch Tom’s presentation. Photo: Fe Lumsdaine, Lumsdaine Photography...

Flood Country: An Environmental History of the Murray-Darling Basin

By Emily O’Gorman Available now: http://www.publish.csiro.au/nid/21/pid/6650.htm Flood Country examines changing understandings of the rivers, floods and floodplains of the Murray-Darling Basin since 1850. It examines many tensions, ranging from early exchanges between Aboriginal people and settlers about the dangers of floods, through to long running disputes between graziers and irrigators over damming floodwater, and conflicts between residents and colonial governments over whose responsibility it was to protect townships from floods. Flood Country draws on the author’s doctoral research, undertaken in the School of History at the Australian National University. The final stages of research and writing were carried out at Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research at the University of Wollongong as part of a postdoctoral candidacy. Flood Country is available now from CSIRO Publishing.   Emily O’Gorman is an Associate Research Fellow at the Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research at the University of...

Place and Placelessness: A Virtual Environmental History Workshop – CFP

The New Scholars group of the Network in Canadian History and Environment would like to invite submissions for the 3rd annual Place and Placelessness Online Workshop, taking place October 18-19, 2012. This online symposium is intended for graduate students and recently graduated scholars from all disciplines that seek to better understand the complex relationships between nature and culture, with particular attention paid to the theme of climate. The workshop attempts to replicate the collegiate atmosphere of a shared-space meeting by using a variety of internet tools, including WordPress, Skype, Google Maps, Youtube, Facebook and Twitter to share ideas and participate in engaged discussion. This model should appeal especially to those who are eager for academic gatherings without the cost or carbon footprint of in-person meetings. The workshop encourages participation from students across the humanities, social sciences and physical sciences in an attempt to facilitate trans-disciplinary and transnational dialogue for global issues such as anthropogenic climate change. Although the expectation is that most submissions will come in the form of in-progress pieces of writing, the organizers welcome submissions of alternative multi-media projects that utilize online tools to stimulate arguments about our relationship with local, regional, and transnational environments. All interested presenters must submit a CV, as well as a 300 word abstract outlining their topic, what format their contribution will take, and how their paper or project aims to broaden, illustrate or complicate the notion of ‘climate’ by September 4th, 2012. The theme of climate is loosely defined, and may include perspectives on: governance and policy history environmental history and industry/industrialization histories of activism or environmentalism global climates, international relations...