Recording of Professor Sverker Sörlin’s lecture

Global Change, History and Planetary Futures: Stories from Sweden’s far northern edge On Tuesday 29 May Professor Sverker Sörlin gave a public lecture to a packed theatre at the Australian National University. Download the audio recording from the Centre for Environmental History’s...

Book launch: Accommodating Australians by Patrick Troy

The Canberra launch of Patrick Troy’s Accommodating Australians: Commonwealth Government Involvement in Housing (Federation Press, 2012) will be on 19 June 2012 in the Finkel Theatre of the John Curtin School of Medical Research. The launch will by Professor Stuart Macintrye AO, Ernest Scott Professor of History at the University of Melbourne, and will include a public lecture by Professor Macintyre and response by Professor Troy. The reception will commence at 5:30 pm, with the lecture at 6:00-6:45. Following the launch there will be an informal celebration at Vivaldis for those who wish to book a table from 7.15. All...

Eric Rolls Memorial Lecture

National Library Theatre, Canberra, Tuesday 17 July, 6pm Presented by the Watermark Literary Society in association with the National Library of Australia A Meander Down a River or Two – How Water Defines Our Continent and Its Future Acclaimed environmental scientist, Professor Richard Kingsford, explores the challenges of managing our rivers in the second lecture in honour of author Eric Rolls. Rivers convey water into some of the most spectacular places on earth or provide nutrients for estuarine and marine systems but we have destroyed much of this, particularly in the Murray-Darling Basin. The challenge is to learn from what we have done and not make the same mistakes but also rehabilitate our rivers. There is a headlong pursuit for increased populations in Australia and a drive to make the north “the food bowl of Asia”. The implications for rivers are considerable. This lecture will cover some of these challenges by meandering down some rivers in the Lake Eyre and Murray-Darling Basins. Professor Richard Kingsford is Director of the Australian Wetlands and Rivers Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences of the University of NSW. For over 20 years, he has researched the waterbirds, wetlands and rivers of arid Australia, which cover about 70% of the continent. He has identified the significant impacts of water resource development on the rivers and wetlands of the Murray-Darling Basin and other parts of the world and he has contributed to policy development and environmental flow management. He is a member of the Australian Government’s Environmental Flows Scientific Committee. He received a Eureka Award in 2001 for his research demonstrating the ecological...

Regarding the Earth: Ecological Vision in Word and Image

31 August – 2 September 2012 in Melbourne Abstract By: 22 June 2012 (extended deadline) http://arts.monash.edu.au/ecps/conferences/regarding-the-earth/   4th ASLEC-ANZ Biennial Conference in association with RMIT and Monash Universities   Confirmed keynote speakers: Professor Ursula Heise (UC Stanford) and Professor Timothy Morton (UC Davis) Following on from our last conference, ‘Sounding the Earth: Music, Language, and Acoustic Ecology’ (Launceston, 2010), the 2012 ASLEC-ANZ conference, co-hosted by RMIT and Monash Universities, continues our ecological exploration of the senses with a focus on vision. Papers are invited that consider the ecological implications of different ways of perceiving, imagining, valuing and representing Earth, whether understood as planet, place or collective, comprising a multiplicity of more-than-human entities, agencies and processes. The Association for the Study of Literature, Environment and Culture (Australia-New Zealand) is a multi-disciplinary organisation, and we welcome contributions from a wide range of research fields, including ecophilosophy, environmental history, cultural geography, religion and ecology, science studies and art history, as well as ecocritical literary and cultural studies. The conference will open with a public forum at RMIT on ‘Re-Imagining the Global: Culture and Climate Change’ on Friday evening, 31st August, at which Ursula Heise and Tim Morton will also be speaking. Areas for consideration include: • Art, environment and ecological aesthetics • Ecopoetics, biosemiotics and ontopoetics • Environmental ethics and transpecies justice • Prophetic witness and apocalyptic imagining • New materialisms and speculative realism • Mapping, modelling and inventorying • Reading the past, envisioning the future • Wayfaring, walking, and witnessing • Indigenous knowledges, the colonial gaze, and postcolonial perspectives • Ecohumanities and green pedagogies • The earth looking back: nonhuman agency...