Latest ENNZ, vol. 6, no. 2

  In this issue, Paul Star challenges historians to think about the role of private settlers in environmental change, putting forward the concept of ‘biota barons’ to describe those settlers whose actions resulted in significant ecological changes in...

Editorial Introduction

James Beattie Environment was strongly represented at the recently-held Past Tensions, New Zealand Historical Association Conference, hosted by the History Programme, University of Waikato from 16 to 18 November 2011. Six streams – and no fewer than 20 papers out of...

New Zealand’s Biota Barons

New Zealand’s Biota Barons: Ecological Transformation In Colonial New Zealand[1] Paul Star[2] What trees and birds does a New Zealander most often see?  Of trees, maybe manuka and kowhai, but more likely poplar and gum. Of birds, maybe tui and piwakawaka (fantail),...

Request: Medicinal Plants In New Zealand, 1850s-1920s

Medicinal Plants In New Zealand, 1850s-1920s Joanna Bishop[1] The history of medicinal plants is a subject that often prompts recollections of favoured or loathed family remedies, handed down through generations and representative of a relative’s resourcefulness or...

Review: Māori and the Environment

REVIEW: Māori and the Environment: Kaitiaki. Edited by Rachael Selby, Pātaka Moore and Malcolm Mulholland, Huia Publishers, 2010, 372 pp., ISBN: 978-1-86969-402-9.[1] Charles Dawson[2] The nineteen essays in this book are a compelling combination of outrage,...