Environmental History PhD Workshop

Centre for Environmental History, Australian National University, Canberra 25-29 October, 2010 Applications for the 2010 workshop have closed. The next workshop will be held in 2012 Are you writing a PhD in some aspect of environmental history? For five days in October this year, the Centre for Environmental History at the Australian National University will be running a workshop for PhD students from around the country who are researching aspects of environmental history in Australia, New Zealand or elsewhere. This is the fifth biennial workshop in environmental history run at ANU since 2002. The aim of the workshop is to bring together doctoral students with common interests to learn from one another about how to address significant, exciting themes in this emerging field of scholarship.  Students will be expected to participate by speaking and writing about their own research, and by doing some preparatory reading that will be provided in advance. Morning sessions will be held each of the five days (Monday 25 October to Friday 29 October). These will feature seminars on major themes in environmental history as well as student presentations on their doctoral research.  Afternoons will mostly be reserved for preparatory reading, fieldwork, optional museum and archival visits, and informal meetings. Course organisers will be Professor Tom Griffiths (Centre for Environmental History, ANU), Dr Libby Robin (Fenner School of Environment and Society ANU/Centre for Historical Research, National Museum of Australia), Dr Nicholas Brown (School of History, Research School of Social Sciences ANU/Centre for Historical Research National Museum of Australia), Dr Gregory Barton (Centre for Environmental History, ANU), Dr Christine Hansen (Centre for Environmental History, ANU), Dr...

Audio: Paul Warde and Sverker Sörlin

Recordings of two lectures from recent events hosted by the Centre for Environmental History: Paul Warde’s public lecture ‘Figuring the Future: Forests and the Welfare of Posterity 1500-1850’ delivered at An Evening of Environmental History, Australian National University, 6 May 2010. Download Paul Warde’s lecture (46 mins, MP3 44MB). Sverker Sörlin’s lecture ‘Futures, Climate and Science from Charles Richet to the Anthropocene’ delivered at Expertise for the Future III: Canberra Workshop, National Museum of Australia, 7 May 2010. Download Sverker Sörlin’s lecture (50 mins, MP3 47MB). Paul Warde is a Reader in Early Modern History at the University of East Anglia. His books include Economy, Ecology and State Formation in Early Modern Germany (2006) and (co-edited with Sverker Sörlin) Nature’s End: History and the Environment (Palgrave, 2009). Paul runs the project History and Sustainability at the Centre for History and Economics, King’s College, Cambridge. Sverker Sörlin is professor of Environmental History in the Division of History of Science and Technology at the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, and he serves on the Advisory Board of the Stockholm Resilience Centre, where he is also senior...

World Forest History – A New Book Series

This is a call for chapter proposals. World Forest History, a new edited book series by the Australian National University E Press, will publish individual volumes of forest history on individual countries and regions of the world. Each book, published in hardcopy and available as a free download, provides a definitive outline of the rise of state and scientific forestry and the evolution of environmental land management practices, with a special focus on colonial forestry and its legacy. The first edited books will focus on the Indian subcontinent and Southern Africa. Subsequent volumes will focus on individual countries and regions in Australia, Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, and South America. Individuals with research and publication experience related to the history of humans and forests in these countries/regions are welcome to submit abstracts of possible chronological, historiographical, and thematic chapters and to talk with the editors about possible contributions. Each book will also feature a substantial section of primary sources related to the history of humans and forests. These selections will include laws, scientific documents, literature, oral history, pictures, art, and other important documents. Authors are encouraged to submit original sources of up to 3,000 words with their chapters. Gregory Barton, research fellow in environmental history at the Australian National University, is the Editor in Chief of the series. Brett Bennett, a PhD student in history at the University of Texas at Austin, will help to coordinate the series. The series will be affiliated with the Centre for Environmental History at the Australian National University. The Australian National University E press will publish each book in hardcopy form and electronically....