Please join us for an evening of environmental history

Thursday 6 May, 5-7 pm Forestry Lecture Theatre Building 48 Australian National University Part 1: Presentation of the National Museum of Australia Student Prize for Australian Environmental History and History of Science 2010 by John Passioura, Fellow, Australian Academy of Science and Mathew Trinca, Acting Director National Museum of Australia Part 2: Public Lecture: ‘Figuring the Future: Forests and the Welfare of Posterity 1500-1850’ Paul Warde Centre for Economic History, Cambridge University and School of History University of East Anglia Paul Warde works on the environmental, economic and social history of early modern Europe. His interests include the use of wood as a fundamental resource in pre-industrial society; the long-term history of energy use in relation to economic, environmental and social change; and the development of institutions for regulating resources and welfare support. His books include Ecology, Economy and State Formation in Early Modern Germany, (Cambridge University Press, 2006) and (co-edited with Sverker Sörlin) Nature’s End. History and the Environment (Palgrave, 2009). Paul runs the project History and Sustainability at the Centre for History and Economics, King’s College, Cambridge. See the website http://www-histecon.kings.cam.ac.uk/envdoc/sustainability/index.html Part 3: Drinks and nibbles with our speaker, our student prizewinner and other environmental history networkers. Please note that the Forestry Car park is now closed because of building works. Event sponsored by National Museum of Australia, Australian Academy of Science and the Centre for Environmental History, Australian National...

At the Riverside: Jesuit missionaries and Aboriginal people at the Daly River, Northern Territory, 1886-1899.

A cross-cultural encounter. Dr. Stefan Sippell University of Munich Time: 4.15-5.30pm, Wednesday 28 April 2010 McDonald Room, Menzies Library Australian National University 24th September 1886. They have arrived. Father Adolf Kristen and Brother Vinzenz Scharmer are the first Austrian Jesuits to cast their eyes on the Daly River – here the missionaries are going to attempt to convert the Aboriginal people in the area to the Roman Catholic faith. But – the author of the diary records – as the two men step to the water’s edge they are disappointed: “No doubt they expected to find it resemble the Danube in its majestic flow, and found it smaller than the river Inn!” What they saw in the surface of the water is to all intents and purposes their own reflection … 3rd March 1899. There is one short sentence in the diary: “The river is starting to rise.” And then the floods come, as in almost every year; but this time it almost completely destroys the Jesuits’ settlement – shortly after the Superior, with the authorisation of the Superior General in Rome, decides that all the missionaries must leave the Daly River from one day to the next. No one else compares the river with the Inn or the Danube. The Aborigines are left to their fate. The flood is not the only reason for abandoning the mission. The mirror images have now become dim, blurred and distorted. In my talk I will attempt to get the feel of the period between these two entries in the Jesuits’ diary – although we all know that this is, strictly speaking,...